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Fillable Form Schedule D (Form 1040)

Schedule D (Form 1040) by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is a tax form used to report capital gains and losses.

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What is Schedule D (Form 1040)?

According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Schedule D (Form 1040), Capital Gains and Losses, is a document used to report the following:

  • The sale or exchange of a capital asset not reported on another form or schedule;
  • Gains from involuntary conversions, other than from casualty or theft, of capital assets not held for business or profit; and
  • Nonbusiness bad debts.

Specifically, Schedule D (Form 1040) is used to:

  • Figure the overall gain or loss from transactions reported on Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets;
  • Report certain transactions you do not have to report on Form 8949;
  • Report a gain from Form 2439, Notice to Shareholder of Undistributed Long-Term Capital Gains, or Form 6252, Installment Sale Income, or Part I of Form 4797, Sales of Business Property;
  • Report a gain or loss from Form 4684, Casualties and Thefts, Form 6781, Gains and Losses From Section 1256 Contracts and Straddles, or Form 8824, Like-Kind Exchanges;
  • Report a gain or loss from a partnership, S corporation, estate, or trust;
  • Report capital gain distributions not reported directly on line 7 of Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, or effectively connected capital gain distributions not reported directly on line 7 of Form 1040-NR, U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return; or
  • Report a capital loss carryover from the previous tax year to the current tax year.

How to fill out Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Note:

  • File Form 8949 before you complete Schedule D (Form 1040) to determine the amount to enter on lines 1b, 2, 3, 8b, 9, and 10.
  • Round off cents to whole dollars to easily complete parts I and II. For example, $2.39 becomes $2 and $3.50 becomes $4. However, you need to include the cents when adding two or more amounts. Round off only their total.
  • You can find the required worksheets in the instructions for Schedule D (Form 1040) provided by the IRS.

Name(s) shown on return

Enter the name or names shown on your return.

Your social security number

Enter your Social Security Number (SSN).

Did you dispose of any investment(s) in a qualified opportunity fund during the tax year?

Mark Yes if you disposed of any investments in a qualified opportunity fund during the tax year. Then, attach Form 8949. If not, mark No.

Part I. Short-Term Capital Gains and Losses — Generally Assets Held One Year or Loss

Line 1a. Totals for all short-term transactions reported on Form 1099-B for which basis was reported to the IRS and for which you have no adjustments.

Enter the amount for all the short-term transactions you reported on Form 1099-B, Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange. However, if you choose to report all these transactions on Form 8949, leave this line blank and go to line 1b.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 1099-B.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 1099-B.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d) and enter the total.

Line 1b. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box A checked

If you checked box (A) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part I, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part I, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 2. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box B checked

If you checked box (B) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part I, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part I, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 3. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box C checked

If you checked box (C) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part I, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part I, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 4. Short-term gain from Form 6252 and short-term gain or (loss) from Forms 4684, 6781, and 8824

Enter the following:

  • Amount of the short-term gain you listed on line 26 of Form 6252;
  • Amount of the short-term gain or loss you listed on line 15 of Form 4684;
  • Amount of the short-term gain or loss you listed on line 8 of Form 6781; and
  • Amount of the short-term gain or loss you listed on line 22 of Form 8824.

Line 5. Net short-term gain or (loss) from partnerships, S corporations, estates, and trusts from Schedule(s) K-1

Enter the amount of the net short-term gain or loss from partnerships, S corporations, estates, and trusts from your Schedule K-1 of Form 1065, Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.

Line 6. Short-term capital loss carryover. Enter the amount, if any, from line 8 of your Capital Loss Carryover Worksheet in the instructions

Enter the amount of your short-term capital loss carryover for the current tax year listed on line 8 of your Capital Loss Carryover Worksheet.

Line 7. Net short-term capital gain or (loss)

Add all the amount you listed in column (h) of lines 1a through 6. Then, enter the total. If you have any long-term capital gains or losses, complete Part II below. Otherwise, proceed to Part III.

Part II. Long-Term Capital Gains and Losses — Generally Assets Held More Than One Year

Line 8a. Totals for all long-term transactions reported on Form 1099-B for which basis was reported to the IRS and for which you have no adjustments.

Enter the amount for all the long-term transactions you reported on Form 1099-B. However, if you choose to report all these transactions on Form 8949, leave this line blank and go to line 8b.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 1099-B.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 1099-B.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d) and enter the total.

Line 8b. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box D checked

If you checked box (D) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the long-term transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part II, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part II, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 9. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box E checked

If you checked box (E) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the long-term transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part II, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part II, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 10. Totals for all transactions reported on Form(s) 8949 with Box F checked

If you checked box (F) on Form 8949, you may enter the amount of the long-term transactions below.

(d) Proceeds (sales price)

Enter the proceeds or sales price you reported on Form 8949.

(e) Cost (or other basis)

Enter the costs or other basis you reported on Form 8949.

(g) Adjustments to gain or loss from Form(s) 8949, Part II, line 2, column (g)

Enter the total amount of adjustments you reported on Part II, line 2, column (g) of Form 8949.

(h) Gain or (loss) Subtract column (e) from column (d) and combine the result with column (g)

Subtract the amount listed in column (e) from column (d). Then, add the total to the amount listed in column (g) and enter.

Line 11. Gain from Form 4797, Part I; long-term gain from Forms 2439 and 6252; and long-term gain or (loss) from Forms 4684, 6781, and 8824

Enter the following:

  • Amount of the long-term gain you listed on line 9 of Form 4797;
  • Amount of the long-term gain you listed on line 1a of Form 2439;
  • Amount of the long-term gain you listed on line 26 of Form 6252;
  • Amount of the long-term gain or loss you listed on line 15 of Form 4684;
  • Amount of the long-term gain or loss you listed on line 9 of Form 6781; and
  • Amount of the long-term gain or loss you listed on line 22 of Form 8824.

Line 12. Net long-term gain or (loss) from partnerships, S corporations, estates, and trusts from Schedule(s) K-1

Enter the amount of the net long-term gain or loss from partnerships, S corporations, estates, and trusts from your Schedule K-1 of Form 1065.

Line 13. Capital gain distributions

Enter the total capital gain distributions paid to you during the tax year, regardless of how long you held your investment. You can get the amount you reported on line 2a of your Form 1099-DIV, Dividends and Distributions.

Line 14. Long-term capital loss carryover.

Enter the amount of the long-term capital loss carryover you entered on line 13 of the Capital Loss Carryover Worksheet.

Line 15. Net long-term capital gain or (loss)

Add all the amount you listed in column (h) of lines 8a through 14. Then, enter the total and proceed to Part III.

Line 16. Combine lines 7 and 15 and enter the result

Add the amount you listed on lines 7 and 15. Then, enter the total.

  • If the total is a gain, enter it on line 16 of Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, U.S. Tax Return for Seniors, and on line 7 of Form 1040-NR. Then, proceed to line 17.
  • If the total is a loss, skip lines 17 through 20 below. Then, proceed to line 21.
  • If the total is zero, skip lines 17 through 21 below and enter -0- on line 7 of Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, and Form 1040-NR. Then, proceed to line 22.

Line 17. Are lines 15 and 16 both gains?

Mark Yes if the amount on lines 15 and 16 are gains. Then, complete line 18. If not, mark No. Then, proceed to line 22.

Line 18. If you are required to complete the 28% Rate Gain Worksheet (see instructions), enter the amount, if any, from line 7 of that worksheet

Enter the amount you listed on line 7 of your 28% Rate Gain Worksheet.

Line 19. If you are required to complete the Unrecaptured Section 1250 Gain Worksheet, enter the amount, if any, from line 18 of that worksheet

Enter the amount you listed on line 18 of your Unrecaptured Section 1250 Gain Worksheet.

Line 20. Are lines 18 and 19 both zero or blank and are you not filing Form 4952?

Mark Yes if the amount listed on lines 18 and 19 are zero or blank and you are not filing Form 4952. Then, complete the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet for line 16 of Form 1040 and Form 1040-SR. Do not complete lines 21 and 22 below.

If not, mark No. Then, complete the Schedule D Tax Worksheet and do not complete lines 21 and 22 below.

Line 21. If line 16 is a loss, enter here and on Form 1040, 1040-SR, or 1040-NR, line 7, the smaller of:

If line 16 is a loss, enter here and on line 7 of Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, or Form 1040-NR the smaller of:

  • The loss on line 16;
  • $3,000; or
  • $1,500 if married and filing separately.

Line 22. Do you have qualified dividends on Form 1040, 1040-SR, or 1040-NR, line 3a?

Mark Yes if you have qualified dividends on line 3a of Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, and Form 1040-NR. Then, complete the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet for line 16 of Form 1040 and Form 1040-SR.

If not, mark No. Then, complete the rest of Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, or Form 1040-NR.

Frequently Asked Questions About Schedule D (Form 1040)

Who must file Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Schedule D (Form 1040) is an ad hoc schedule used to report capital gains and losses. Transactions that require the assistance of a Schedule D (Form 1040) include the following:

  • Sale or disposition of capital assets held more than one year (long-term)
  • Short-term transactions not reported on another form or schedule
  • Gains from involuntary conversions
  • Sales of a capital asset in excess of net investment income for the year

In general, Schedule D (Form 1040) is filed with Form 1040-NR, Form 1040-SR, and Form 1040 by taxpayers who have short-term and long-term capital gains and short-term and long-term capital losses.

Schedule D (Form 1040) is also used by estates and trusts to report their share of any net capital gain, whether the gain was distributed or not. Estates and trusts use Schedule D (Form 1040) for transactions involving the estate or trust’s own capital assets.

What are capital gains on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Capital gains are the net gain you realize from the sale of a capital asset held for more than one year. Capital assets include most items of property you own and use for personal purposes or investment, such as your home, car, furniture, stocks, and bonds.

There are two types of capital gains — short-term and long-term.

A short-term capital gain is a gain from the sale of a capital asset held for one year or less but more than six months. Short-term gains are taxed as ordinary income. The maximum federal income tax rate for short-term capital gains is your individual income tax rate.

A long-term capital gain is a gain from the sale of a capital asset held for more than one year. The maximum federal income tax rate for long-term capital gains is usually lower than your individual income tax rate. The "maximum" rate refers to the highest rate that can apply to any of your taxable income from sources other than long-term capital gains.

How are capital gains calculated on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

To figure your net short-term gain or loss, you combine all your short-term gains and losses. To figure your net long-term gain or loss, you combine all your long-term gains and losses. Generally, if the amount of your taxable capital gain is more than the amount of your allowable capital loss, you must report the net amount on Schedule D (Form 1040).

Short-term gains and losses are reported on Part I (short-term) of Schedule D (Form 1040). Net long-term gains or losses are reported on Part II (long-term) of Schedule D (Form 1040).

What are capital losses on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Capital losses are the excess of your allowable deductions from the sales or exchanges of capital assets over your gains.

A capital loss occurs when you sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of a capital asset for less than what you paid for it. A net loss from the sale or trade of short-term and long-term collectibles is also a capital loss. If your losses are more than your gains, you have a capital loss.

The amount of the capital loss is generally the difference between the adjusted basis and the amount realized for each disposition transaction. Losses from the sale or trade of collectibles are deductible only to the extent they are more than any gain on the same transaction.

There are two types of capital loss — short-term and long-term.

A short-term capital loss is a capital loss that arises from the sale or trade of a capital asset held for one year or less but more than six months. Short-term loss can be used to offset short-term gain and is limited to the amount of your short-term gain.

A long-term capital loss is a capital loss that arises from the sale or trade of a capital asset held for more than one year. Long-term losses offset only long-term gains and are used only to reduce (or eliminate) your taxable income from long-term gains.

In most cases, you report capital gains and losses on Schedule D (Form 1040). However, if your capital losses are more than your capital gains, you can claim the difference as a deduction against other income up to $3,000 annually. This loss is known as "capital loss carryover."

What are capital assets on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Generally, capital assets include most property you own and use for personal purposes or investment.

Capital assets include but are not limited to:

  • Houses, buildings, land, and cars;
  • Stocks and bonds held by the taxpayer;
  • Personal use property such as a boat or personal airplane;
  • Intangible assets such as copyrights, patents, and securities;
  • Minerals and other natural resources; and
  • Business equipment.

What are the main examples of Schedule D (Form 1040) income?

The main examples of Schedule D (Form 1040) income are:

  • Sales and exchanges of capital assets, such as stocks and bonds;
  • The sale or exchange of a business or investment property for profit;
  • Settlements from lawsuits and the award of damages to compensate you for your loss;
  • Gains from involuntary conversions, such as insurance payments in connection with the damage or destruction of property due to a casualty; and
  • Gains and losses from the disposition of property, such as stocks or other securities, including mutual fund shares or other regulated investment company shares.

What is the difference between Schedule D (Form 1040) and Form 8949?

Before you file your tax return, you should complete Schedule D (Form 1040). However, Schedule D (Form 1040) does not contain all the rules for reporting gains and losses.

Form 8949 is a document that may be used as a companion to Schedule D (Form 1040) because it contains the amount needed to file lines 1b, 2, 3, 8b, 9, and 10 on Schedule D (Form 1040).

Form 8949 is also used to list transactions you do not have to report on Schedule D (Form 1040), such as those involving stocks and bonds traded on foreign exchanges, certain dividends paid by foreign corporations, and distributions from certain regulated investments company stock.

What is the net capital gain on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

The net capital gain is the total amount of your gains from sales or exchanges of capital assets minus the total amount of your losses from such sales or exchanges.

Your capital loss deduction cannot be more than the net capital gain. If your loss is more than your gain, you have a "net capital loss." Your losses are more than your gains.

Do I have to file Form 8949 with Schedule D (Form 1040)?

It depends on whether you have to file Schedule D (Form 1040). If you do, then you must also complete Form 8949 and attach it to your schedule when you file.

You use the same rules that apply to Schedule D (Form 1040) for figuring your net gain or loss and your net ordinary gain or loss on Form 8949.

You must use Form 8949 to report your transactions for lines 1b, 2, 3, 8b, 9, and 10 of Schedule D (Form 1040).

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) encourages you to file your Form 1040 Schedule D using the same order in which it is listed on Form 8949. You may also be required to file Form 8949 with Schedule D (Form 1040) if you sold assets that are not reported on Schedule D (Form 1040).

How do I report options on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

You must report information about stock options in accordance with the instructions to Schedule D (Form 1040). You may refer to the "How to fill out Schedule D (Form 1040)?" section above.

How do I report the sale of a home on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

If you sold your main home, do not report it on your tax return unless your gain exceeds your maximum exclusion amount.

The maximum exclusion depends on whether you owned and used the home as your main home for at least two of the five years before its sale or exchange.

You have a gain if you sell your house for more than its adjusted basis. You have a loss if you sell it for less than the amount included in your basis. A sale of your main home may qualify for an exclusion from income up to $250,000. If there is a gain, it may be excluded from your gross income up to $500,000 if you are married and file a joint return.

Report the amount generated from selling your house on Schedule D (Form 1040). If you held your house for a period of less than one year before selling it, you have a short-term capital gain. If you had your house for more than a year before selling it, you have a long-term capital gain.

If the sales price is the same as your adjusted basis in the house, this is a "disposal" and not a sale. In such a case, you have neither a gain nor a loss until you recover all of your cost or other bases.

What is the difference between Schedule D (Form 1040) and Form 4797?

Schedule D (Form 1040) is used to report capital gains and losses from the sale or exchange of a capital asset. It must be attached to your Form 1040 when you file it.

While Form 4797, Sales of Business Property, is used to report the sales or exchanges of assets used in your trade or business. It is also filed along with your Form 1040.

You need the information on Form 4797 to fill out Schedule D (Form 1040) Part II, line 11.

How do I report capital gains on Schedule D (Form 1040)?

If you know the fair market value of your capital asset, gain or loss is usually easy to figure.

If the selling price is less than your adjusted basis, you have a gain. It is generally true even if you received no money in the transaction. If this is the case, enter all amounts on Schedule D (Form 1040) in the appropriate part.

If you held the property for more than one year, your gain is long-term. Thus, you enter your capital gains on Part II of Schedule D (Form 1040).

If you held it for one year or less, your capital gain is short-term. Thus, you must enter your capital gains on Part I of Schedule D (form 1040).

What is the difference between capital gains and ordinary income?

Capital gains are the net gain you realize from the sale of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds that are subject to special treatment. You must report this type of gain on Schedule D (Form 1040) and, if required, on Form 8949.

Ordinary income is the total amount you earned during the year from salaries, wages, professional fees, business income, royalties, and other sources.

Ordinary income is reported on Form 1040 and Form 1040-SR, U.S. Tax Return for Seniors, line 1. It is subject to ordinary tax rates rather than capital gains rates, which are lower.

Can I file my Schedule D (Form 1040) online?

Yes, you can file Schedule D (Form 1040) online. You may file Schedule D (Form 1040) electronically using the Internal Revenue Service Free File program. However, your adjusted gross income must be $57,000 or less to qualify for this electronic filing option.

You may also electronically file Schedule D (Form 1040) through commercial software offering products approved by the IRS.

What is the purpose of Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Schedule D (Form 1040) must be attached to your tax return and reports the amount of your taxable and non-taxable capital gains and losses.

Schedule D (Form 1040) is used to report capital gains and losses from the sale or exchange of a capital asset. You may be required to attach it with your Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, or Form 1040-NR.

Do I need to file Schedule D (Form 1040)?

If you realized a gain or loss from the sale or exchange of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, you must report it on Schedule D (Form 1040). However, you do not need to file Schedule D (Form 1040) if:

  • you have no capital gain or loss;
  • your only gains and losses are the result of selling your home during a period in which you bought a new main home after July 28, 1997; or
  • your only gains or losses are the result of selling stocks, bonds, etc., through a broker.

When is Schedule D (Form 1040) required?

Schedule D (Form 1040) is required when you have the gain or loss from the sale of capital assets.

Schedule D (Form 1040) is required if you are engaged in a trade or business other than as an employee. If you are not engaged in a trade or business other than as an employee, Schedule D (Form 1040) must be used to report your gains or losses on the sales or exchanges of capital assets and transactions.

Is Schedule D (Form 1040) required if I have no capital gains or losses?

Schedule D (Form 1040) is only required when you have capital gains or losses from the sale of capital assets.

If you have no capital gains or losses, Schedule D (Form 1040) is not required to be filed. However, Schedule D (Form 1040) must still be attached in case a loss can be claimed.

Can I file Schedule D (Form 1040) for free?

Yes, you can file Schedule D (Form 1040) for free using the Free File program. You must be eligible to use this program if your adjusted gross income (AGI) is at a certain level.

You can electronically file your Schedule D (Form 1040) with the Internal Revenue Service on Free File program if your adjusted gross income is $57,000 or less.

You can file Schedule D (Form 1040) electronically through commercial software, but you must purchase the schedule.

Is Form 1040 Schedule D always required?

No, Schedule D (Form 1040) is not required to be filed if you have no capital gains or losses. However, Schedule D (Form 1040) must still be attached in case a loss can be claimed.

What should I do if my Schedule D (Form 1040) is too complicated for me to file myself?

Schedule D (Form 1040) can be quite complicated. In such a case, it is best to speak with a tax professional.

A tax professional may help you file Schedule D (Form 1040) even if your schedule is complicated. A tax professional may also help you determine the types of transactions that are taxable or non-taxable, what the adjusted basis is, and which exemptions apply to your transaction.

Hiring a tax professional may be costly, but he or she may help you if:

  • you do not know whether to file Schedule D (Form 1040), and you have capital gains or losses;
  • the schedule is too complicated for you to be able to prepare it yourself; or
  • you would like help figuring the allowable deduction for your losses.

If you do not want to spend money to prepare Schedule D (Form 1040), you may refer to the instructions above.

What are the qualifications for filing Schedule D (Form 1040)?

There are no qualifications for filing Schedule D (Form 1040) unless you are engaged in a trade or business.

If you are not engaged in trade or business, Schedule D (Form 1040) is only required when you have capital gains or losses from the sale of capital assets. If you had no gains or losses, Schedule D (Form 1040) is not required to be attached to your tax return.

How to file Schedule D (Form 1040)?

Attach your accomplished Schedule D (Form 1040) to your Form 1040, Form 1040-SR, or Form 1040-NR.

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