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Fillable Form Affidavit of Death

Affidavit of Death is a legal document used to inform and declare to companies, banks, businesses, or any other organizations that a person has died. Through this document, a representative may act on behalf of the deceased person.

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What is an Affidavit of Death?

An Affidavit of Death is a legal document used to inform and declare to companies, banks, businesses, or any other organizations that a person has died. Through an Affidavit of Death Form, a representative may act on behalf of the deceased person.

An Affidavit of Death Template is a sworn statement, completed by someone with personal knowledge of another’s death, declaring the person has died. Typically, the affidavit is accompanied by a certified copy of a death certificate. This affidavit may also be referred to by different names, including:

Following someone’s death, their legal issues and estate must be handled. A legal document called an affidavit of death is used to prove that someone has died. Affidavits of death are required in a number of situations concerning the efficient transfer and distribution of property, including:

  • The authority to close a checking account
  • The ability to pass title to property from the deceased to their heirs
  • To accomplish other tasks wherein the deceased had:
    • An interest
    • A debt
    • A claim

The most common situations for using an affidavit of death involve the transfer of property from the decedent to their heirs, through a variety of means.

  • Joint Tenancy – Most often, married couples hold their homes in “joint tenancy.” When one spouse dies, the other spouse becomes the sole owner of the property. The surviving spouse can file a notification with the title company and the county property assessor using an Affidavit of Death of Joint Tenant. The title is then changed to only reflect ownership of the surviving spouse. Because the property cannot be transferred without the approval of all title owners, affidavits of death of joint tenancy are important.
  • Trustee – Many people have living trusts. When a married couple has established a living trust together, they are both considered co-trustors. When one spouse dies, the property in the trust falls to the surviving trustor, and the surviving trustor becomes the sole owner of the living trust’s assets. If no co-trustor is named, as in the case of a single person’s living trust, the property will be passed to a successor trustee. Once the property owner dies, the successor trustee is in charge of disbursing the trust’s assets to the designated beneficiaries. An Affidavit of Death of Trustee establishes the death of the trustee and helps transfer property to the rightful beneficiaries.
  • Death of Spouse – A death-related affidavit is frequently required by married couples for reasons other than real property held in joint tenancy. The surviving spouse can submit an Affidavit of Death of Spouse to remove the deceased spouse’s name from joint credit cards, bank accounts, money market accounts, and other accounts. This affidavit also allows funds to be transferred from a deceased person’s lone account to a lawful spouse (barring a will or transfer on death instruction leaving the contents of the account to someone else).

Some states operate under community property laws. This means that all property owned by a married couple equally belongs to both of them. In some community property states, the community property is governed by the rights of survivorship. In these states, the Affidavit of Death of Spouse implicitly transfers the title of all community property directly to the surviving spouse.

  • Death of Grantor – Some states allow for “Transfer on Death,” which means that a person can have a solely personal checking or savings account. Some state laws allow an account holder to name someone to receive the funds in their account in the event of their death. This is known as a death transfer provision. In this situation, an Affidavit of Death of Grantor transfers the property to the designated individual.
  • Death of Intestate – When someone dies “intestate,” it means they died without leaving a will. Each state has “intestacy” laws that designate how property will be distributed, based on kinship. In most states, when a single person dies without children, their property passes to their parents. If both parents are alive, it will be divided between a single surviving parent and siblings; if both parents are deceased, it will be divided between siblings only. An Affidavit of Death Intestate allows for the legal transfer of property (such as a motor vehicle) to a genuine heir who recognizes themselves as the legal successor under state intestacy laws.
  • Affidavit of Heirship – Similar to an Affidavit of Death Intestate, an Affidavit of Death and Heirship is used in some states when a person dies without a will. Unlike states which allow a person to self-identify themselves as an heir, some states require a third party to identify potential heirs. An Affidavit of Death and Heirship is completed by a disinterested third party. The third party must have personal knowledge of the parents, children, spouses, and, in cases where there are no surviving parents, spouse, children, or grandchildren, the extended family of the deceased.

To a lesser extent, affidavits of death can be used to notify a creditor of a death. The affidavit may also be required in order to collect life insurance proceeds. Affidavits of death may be required for several different situations and are required by most agencies and businesses. As such, it is best to consider printing and having several copies notarized at the same time.

How to fill out an Affidavit of Death?

Get a copy of Affidavit of Death template in PDF format.

Using PDFRun, you can electronically fill out and download a PDF copy of an Affidavit of Death PDF in minutes. Fill it out by following the instructions below.

State

Select your state from the drop-down list.

County

Enter your county.

Name of Representative

Enter your full name.

Date

Enter the date you’re filling out the form following the format: Day, Month, Year.

Relationship to Decedent

Mark the appropriate box indicating your relationship to the decedent. You may select:

  • Executor
  • Administration
  • Heir
  • Survivor

Name of Decedent

Enter the full name of the decedent.

Purpose of the Affidavit

Mark the appropriate box if the purpose of this affidavit is to secure the transfer or delivery of the decedent’s:

  • Real property at the time of their death.
  • Securities at the time of their death.
  • Bank accounts at your financial institution.

Date of Death of the Decedent

Enter the date of death of the decedent following the format: Month, Day, Year.

Decedent’s Address

Enter the decedent’s residential address, including the county and state. You may select the state from the drop-down list.

Years Lived in the Residence

Enter the years the decedent lived in the aforementioned residential address.

Decedent’s Social Security Number

Enter the decedent’s social security number (SSN).

Decedent’s Estate

Mark the appropriate box if you’re requesting the transfer or delivery of the following items. You may select:

  • Real property
  • Securities
  • Bank accounts

Affiant’s Signature

Affix your signature.

Notary Acknowledgment

State

Select your state from the drop-down list.

County

Enter your county.

Seal

The seal must come from the notary public.

Date

Enter the date the form was notarized

Name of Representative

Enter your full name as the undersigned.

Affiant’s Signature

Affix your signature.

Notary Public

Enter the name of the lawyer from the notary public.

Commission Expiration Date

Enter the notary commission’s expiration date.

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Frequently Asked Questions About an Affidavit of Death

What is the purpose of an affidavit of death?

An affidavit of death is a document that individuals use to prove that someone is deceased. The affidavit provides basic information about the deceased person, such as their name, date of death, and place of death. Affidavits of death are often used to settle estate matters, such as distributing the deceased person's assets to their heirs.

It serves as an important piece of evidence in the probate process and can help to avoid potential disputes between family members or other interested parties.

In some cases, an affidavit of death may also be used to settle debts or other financial obligations that the deceased person may have. For example, if the deceased person had a life insurance policy, the beneficiary would need to provide an affidavit of death in order to collect the death benefit.

Affidavits of death are typically signed by a close relative or friend of the deceased person and must be notarized by a notary public.

Take note that an affidavit of death is different from a death certificate, which is a document issued by a government agency that officially declares the death of an individual. A death certificate typically contains more information than an affidavit of death and is generally required for legal purposes.

Who uses an affidavit of death?

An affidavit of death is commonly used by life insurance companies and pension plans to determine if benefits are payable. The affidavit may also be used in probate proceedings to settle the estate of a deceased person.

Some individuals or institutions that may need to obtain an affidavit of death include:

  • The primary beneficiary of a life insurance policy
  • The executor or administrator of a deceased person's estate
  • An heir or beneficiary of a deceased person's estate
  • A creditor of a deceased person
  • A person who has a contract with a deceased person
  • A lender who has a loan with a deceased person as the borrower
  • A government agency that provides benefits to a deceased person's survivors
  • A business that employed a deceased person

These are just some examples of the types of people or organizations that may need to use an affidavit of death. In many cases, multiple people or organizations may need to obtain an affidavit. For example, if a person dies and leaves behind a life insurance policy, the primary beneficiary will need to obtain an affidavit of death in order to collect the death benefit. The executor or administrator of the deceased person's estate may also need to obtain an affidavit in order to settle the estate. If the deceased person had any outstanding loans, the lender may also require an affidavit of death before forgiving the debt.

If you are wondering whether or not you need an affidavit of death, it is best to consult with an attorney or other legal professional. They will be able to advise you on whether or not an affidavit is required in your specific situation.

What should an affidavit of death include?

Here are the key elements that an affidavit of death should have:

  • The full legal name, date of birth, and Social Security number of the decedent — This is critical information that will be used to identify the decedent and confirm their death.
  • The date, time, and location of death — This information will be used to establish when the decedent died and where they died.
  • An explanation of how the affiant knows the decedent is deceased — The affidavit should include first-hand knowledge from the person swearing out the affidavit that the decedent is in fact deceased. This could come from seeing the body or being told by a reliable source such as a doctor or coroner.
  • The full legal name and address of the affiant — The affidavit should include the full name and address of the person swearing out the affidavit. This is necessary so that there is a way to identify and contact the affiant if there are any questions about the death or the affidavit.
  • The relationship of the affiant to the decedent — The affidavit should state how the affiant knew the decedent. This helps to establish the credibility of the affiant and their knowledge of the decedent.
  • A statement that no inquest was held — An inquest is a formal investigation into a death, usually conducted by a coroner or medical examiner. If an inquest was not held, this should be stated in the affidavit.
  • A statement that no autopsy was performed — An autopsy is a medical examination of a body to determine the cause of death. If an autopsy was not performed, this should be stated in the affidavit.
  • The affiant’s signature — The affidavit must be signed by the person swearing out the affidavit. This is necessary to establish that the affidavit is true and correct to the best of the affiant’s knowledge.
  • The date of the affidavit — The affidavit should include the date that it is being sworn out. This helps to establish when the affidavit was made and can be used to determine if the information in the affidavit is still accurate.
  • A notary public’s signature — The affidavit must be signed by a notary public in order for it to be considered legal and binding. The notary public will also stamp or seal the affidavit with their official seal.

An affidavit of death should include the full legal name, date of birth, and Social Security number of the decedent, the date, time, and location of death, an explanation of how the affiant knows the decedent is deceased, the full legal name and address of the affiant, the relationship of the affiant to the decedent, a statement that no inquest was held, a statement that no autopsy was performed, the affiant’s signature, the date of the affidavit, and a notary public’s signature.

How do you write an affidavit of death?

The affidavit of death is a document that is used to certify the death of an individual. This document is typically used in order to settle the estate of the deceased and to claim any life insurance benefits that may be due.

In order to write an affidavit of death, you will need to:

  • Gather the required information — In order to write an affidavit of death, you will need to have certain information about the deceased, such as their full name, date of birth, and date of death. You will also need to know where they died and how they died.
  • Find a notary public — In order to make your affidavit of death official, you will need to have it notarized by a notary public.
  • Write out the affidavit — Once you have gathered all of the required information and found a notary public, you can begin writing out the affidavit of death. Be sure to include all of the relevant information about the deceased, such as their full name, date of birth, and date of death.
  • Sign the affidavit — After you have written out the affidavit of death, you will need to sign it in front of the notary public.
  • Get the affidavit notarized — The final step in writing an affidavit of death is to have it notarized by the notary public. Once the affidavit is notarized, it will be official and can be used for legal purposes.

Follow these steps and you will be able to write an affidavit of death quickly and easily. Be sure to gather all of the required information before beginning, and be sure to have the affidavit notarized in order to make it official.

Where to get an affidavit of death?

If you need an affidavit of death, you can get one from the office of the medical examiner or vital records in the state where the person died. You will need to provide proof of death, such as a death certificate, and identification. There may be a fee for the affidavit.

You will need to have the affidavit notarized. This can be done at a local bank or post office, or you can use an online notary service.

If you are unable to get an affidavit of death from the medical examiner or vital records office, you may be able to get one from a funeral home. The funeral home will need proof of death and identification, and there may be a fee for the affidavit.

There are also websites that provide affidavits of death, but it is important to make sure that the website is reputable.

If you have any questions about getting an affidavit of death, you should contact the medical examiner or vital records office in the state where the person died.

Who are legal heirs?

Under the law, heirs are those who are legally entitled to inherit a deceased person's property. Heirs may be determined by will, by intestate succession (if there is no valid will), or by beneficiary designation (for certain types of property, such as life insurance policies and retirement plans).

An heir is someone who inherits something from someone else. The word can refer to both real property, like land or a house, and personal property, like jewelry or furniture. Heirs are generally people related to the person who died, but they don’t have to be. In some cases, the court may appoint an heir if there is none obvious.

An heir is usually someone related to the deceased person, but this is not always the case. Sometimes, the court will appoint an heir if there is none obvious.

When a person dies without a will, their assets are distributed to their heirs according to state intestacy laws. Intestate succession laws vary from state to state, but typically, assets are distributed to the deceased person's spouse and children. If the deceased person does not have any spouse or children, their assets may be distributed to other family members, such as parents, siblings, or grandparents.

It is important to note that, in some cases, creditors may have claims on a deceased person's assets before the heirs do. This is especially true if the deceased person owed money to the creditor at the time of their death. Creditors may also have claims on assets that are held in joint ownership with another person. For example, if a person dies owing money to a credit card company, the credit card company may have a claim on any assets that the deceased person owned jointly with another person, such as a bank account or a piece of property.

It is also important to note that, in some cases, the government may have claims on a deceased person's assets before the heirs do. This is especially true if the deceased person owed money to the government at the time of their death. For example, if a person dies owing money to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the IRS may have a claim on any assets that the deceased person owned.

Is an affidavit a legal document?

An affidavit is a legal document that is typically used to swear to the veracity of certain statements. An affidavit may be used in a variety of different legal proceedings, and it typically must be signed by the person making the affidavit in front of a notary public.

It is not valid when notarized unless it is sworn to by the person making the affidavit in front of a notary public. It is also generally not valid if it is not signed by the person making the affidavit. When an affidavit is used in court, it is typically considered to be prima facie evidence of the statements contained therein.

An affidavit must be made under oath, which means that the person making the affidavit must swear to or affirm that the statements contained therein are true and correct to the best of his or her knowledge and belief. If an affidavit contains false statements, the person who made the false statements can be subject to criminal charges, such as perjury. Additionally, if an affidavit is used in a civil proceeding and it contains false statements, the person who made the false statements may be subject to civil liability, such as damages.

Why is an affidavit of death important?

An affidavit of death is an important document that can be used to establish the death of an individual. This document can be used for a variety of purposes, including settling an estate, transferring ownership of property, or canceling contracts. An affidavit of death can also be used as evidence in a court proceeding.

Is an affidavit of death legally binding?

An affidavit of death is a legal document that is binding in nature. This means that it can be used as evidence in a court of law to prove that someone has died. The affidavit must be signed by a notary public in order for it to be considered legally binding.

What makes an affidavit of death invalid?

An affidavit of death is invalid if the person making the affidavit was not present at the time of death, if the affidavit was not made within a reasonable time after the death occurred, or if there is reason to believe that the affidavit was not made in good faith. Additionally, an affidavit of death is typically only valid for a limited period of time after it is made, so if too much time has elapsed since the death occurred, the affidavit may no longer be valid.

What makes an affidavit of death legally binding?

An affidavit of death is a legal document that states that an individual is deceased. This document is typically used in situations where the death occurred outside of a hospital or other medical setting, and there is no death certificate available. The affidavit must be signed by two individuals who witnessed the death, and it must be notarized by a Notary Public. Once these requirements are met, the affidavit of death is legally binding.

What should not be included in an affidavit of death?

One should not include any speculation or conjecture in an affidavit of death. Additionally, one should avoid making any statements that could be interpreted as an admission of liability or responsibility for the death. Finally, one should not include any information that is not directly relevant to the circumstances surrounding the death.

Is it necessary to transfer property after death?

No, it is not necessary to transfer property after death. However, if you have a will, it may be helpful to do so in order to ensure that your property is distributed according to your wishes. Additionally, if you have beneficiaries named on any of your accounts, it is important to keep those up to date as well.

If you are the executor of someone's estate, you will be responsible for distributing the deceased person's property according to their will or, if they did not have a will, according to state intestacy laws. Therefore, it is important to understand the process and requirements involved in distributing someone's property after their death.

Transferring property after death can be a complex process, so it is important to seek legal advice if you have any questions or concerns. An experienced attorney can help you navigate the probate process and ensure that your rights are protected.

Who can sign an affidavit of death?

An affidavit of death may be signed by any person who has personal knowledge of the decedent's death. The Affidavit must be notarized.

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