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Fillable Form Employment Verification Letter

An Employment Verification Letter is a document that confirms an individual’s current or former employment status, often required when applying for a loan, mortgage, rental property, or another job opportunity.

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What is an Employment Verification Letter?

An Employment Verification Letter is a document to verify that an employee works or worked at a company and to show his or her income. In other cases, the letter is used to verify employment history. The document may also be referred to as Proof of Employment Letter, Income Verification Letter, Employment Confirmation Letter, Salary Verification Letter, and Work Verification Letter.

When an employee is applying for a loan, the lender may require him or her to provide an employment verification letter. The letter will serve as proof that he or she can honor his or her obligation, has a steady job, and is able to make timely payments. In addition, when applying for a new job, a professional may be required to submit the letter to confirm his or her employment history. Other parties that may require the document include financial institutions, government agencies, insurance companies, and landlords.

To request for an employment verification letter, you may approach the Human Resource (HR) Department of your company. There are companies that have strict restrictions on releasing personal employee information. Request for the letter in a professional manner and give consent for your information to be released to a third-party. In general, HR Departments will prepare the document for their employees. Some will provide a template that employees can give to their managers. For companies that do not enforce strict policies on the release of the said document, they allow their employees to create it and the department or manager will only verify and sign.

As the purpose of an employment verification letter is to verify employment and income information, it should be clear and contain all essential information. If you are an HR staff or manager, when writing it, awareness of its impact on the well-being of a professional should be taken into account. A formal business tone should be used regardless of the recipient. Ask the professional the information that should be included in the letter to ensure that you do not miss crucial details. As an HR professional or manager, you may irregularly receive requests from employees to provide their proof of employment to a third-party; thus, it is ideal to keep a template on file for convenience and promptness.

How to fill out an Employment Verification Letter?

The information that you should include in an employment verification letter would depend on the request of a third-party. Make sure that it is clear and provides accurate information. As a general rule, it should follow a business letter format — writing the recipient’s contact information and date at the top followed by a salutation and the body, and ending with a handwritten signature and your contact information.

For your convenience, PDFRun has an employment verification letter that you can use. Follow the guide below to complete the template correctly.

First, provide the company name of the recipient of the letter and its address. Write the date when the letter was completed.

After the salutation, the body of the letter would require the full legal name of the employee, the name of the company he or she works at, the start date of employment, employment type and job title, number of work hours per week, and salary.

The contact information of the company where the employee works should be at the end of the body if in case the recipient has questions.

Lastly, the person who prepared the document should sign it and provide his or her name, position in the company, contact information, and the name of the company.

Frequently Asked Questions About an Employment Verification Letter

What is included in an Employment Verification Letter?

An Employment Verification Letter is a letter written by your employer which states whether you still work for the company or not. The letter should also indicate how long you have been employed with the company, the status of your position, and salary verification.

It may be difficult to prove that you once held a certain job if you do not have proof, so providing an Employment Verification Letter is a great way to prove your work history. You may use the Employment Verification Letter when you apply for a new job to prove your experiences if needed. Some creditors may ask you to provide an Employment Verification Letter to verify your employment to establish your credit.

Your Employment Verification Letter should be signed either by a human resources representative, your direct supervisor, or the company president.

Who can write an Employment Verification Letter?

Although there is no specific person who can or cannot write an Employment Verification Letter, it is typically written by someone who has the authority to state your employment status with the company.

An Employment Verification Letter may be written by:

  • employer;
  • supervisor;
  • superior;
  • manager;
  • head of human resources; or
  • president of a company.

Can I write my own Employment Verification Letter?

You are not allowed to write your own Employment Verification Letter unless you have been given explicit permission to do so. Writing your own Employment Verification Letter will result in the Employment Verification Letter being invalid.

How long does it take to get an Employment Verification Letter?

There can be many reasons why it takes a while for an Employment Verification Letter to arrive, one of which is that you did not submit all of the required information. If you do not provide your employer with all of your information, they may not be able to send the Employment Verification Letter as soon as possible.

Sometimes an Employment Verification Letter will take some time as it must be issued from the human resources department or upper management. In addition, depending on where you are located geographically can cause a delay as well.

Generally, an Employment Verification Letter should only take a few days to be sent out as long as everything is submitted correctly and promptly. You can contact your employer if you feel that the time it takes for the Employment Verification Letter is too long and has taken longer than expected.

Why do I need an Employment Verification Letter?

There are myriad reasons why you may need an Employment Verification Letter. The most common reason to provide an Employment Verification Letter is for:

  • a new job;
  • verification of employment;
  • verification of work history;
  • applying for a student loan;
  • applying for a mortgage or auto loan;
  • updating your resume and cover letter to reflect specific position titles and employment dates; or
  • establishing credit in the future with a creditor.

Can I get an Employment Verification Letter when I am self-employed?

Employment verification is often done when someone applies for a new job, but it may also be used for another reason, such as applying for a student loan. If you are self-employed, it may be difficult to provide proof of employment verification because you are your own employer.

If you are self-employed, you might consider asking a family member or friend who is employed with an established company to write an Employment Verification Letter on your behalf.

When should I use an Employment Verification Letter?

There are many reasons why you may need an Employment Verification Letter. Here are some reasons to use an Employment Verification Letter:

  • You have just started or ended a job and need verification of employment.
  • You are applying for a new job and want verification of your work history.
  • You are updating your resume with more accurate information, which includes verification of employment dates.
  • You are applying for a new student loan and need verification of your previous education and work history.
  • You want to apply for a mortgage or auto loan, and the creditor wants verification of your previous employment and credit history.
  • You would like proof that you worked at a specific place for a certain number of years.
  • You would like verification that your parents worked at a specific place for a certain number of years to substantiate your claim that you are entitled to Social Security benefits based on their prior employment.
  • You would like verification of past military service.

What can I use as proof of employment?

One of the most effective documents you can use as proof of employment is an Employment Verification Letter. It is a letter that comes directly from your current or previous employer, so it is a great way for you to establish employment verification.

An Employment Verification Letter is a verification of your employment with a specific company. It provides verification of the dates you worked for the company, your job title, and responsibilities and often includes confirmation of your final salary with that organization.

You can also use a paystub or company identification as evidence of employment.

How is employment verification done?

The employment verification may be done through a written or verbal verification. Both methods are used to confirm or verify employment history. However, each method can be most effective when used in the right situation.

Most employers prefer a written verification during the application process. It is because they need to provide verification of employment before an offer is made. This verification must contain all the information you provided on your application, including details like job titles and dates of employment.

Verification done verbally can be more advantageous under certain conditions. For example, if there are no issues regarding verification, you may prefer verification by phone or email because it is more convenient. This method is also feasible if you are applying for a loan or insurance and are currently employed. The lender may immediately call your employer to verify your information.

Asking for verification over the phone may be the best way to get quick and immediate attestation if you are in an emergency. However, written verification is usually preferred because it provides tangible and concrete evidence.

Are Employment Verification Letters usually accepted by employers?

Yes, employers usually accept Employment Verification Letters.

Employment verification is one of the most common ways to verify employment history. When you provide an Employment Verification Letter or pay stubs, employers can easily check your information by calling the verification phone number on the letter or contacting their corporate office.

Most employers use verification documents for screening purposes when applying for a job. If they cannot find verification of your work history, they may not continue the verification process. Employment verification is also commonly submitted to creditors for verification of employment when applying for credit or loans.

How can I find out if an Employment Verification Letter will be accepted by my potential employer?

First, contact your potential employer and ask whether they accept Employment Verification Letters for verification of employment history.

If you are applying online, look at the requirements listed on an employer's website to see if they accept Employment Verification Letters. Some companies may also list what verification documents they accept online, so read the verification requirements carefully before applying for a job.

If you think you will be required to provide an Employment Verification Letter, you may prepare one beforehand.

Does my employer have to give me an Employment Verification Letter?

No, your current or former employer is not required to provide you with an Employment Verification Letter. They may choose to do so or not, depending on whether verification is required for verification purposes.

You may have to ask consent from your employer because they may find the information required in an Employment Verification Letter, like the salary, confidential.

Take note that you cannot draft your own Employment Verification Letter without the consent of your employer because it will be traced back to your employer. The recipient of the letter may call your employer directly to verify its accuracy.

When must an employer respond to an Employment Verification Letter?

There is no specific law that employers are required to respond to their employees' requests for Employment Verification Letters.

Your employer may respond to your request whenever he or she wants to. However, if you need an Employment Verification Letter for urgent reasons, you should contact your employer immediately.

Even if an employer is not required to give a Verification of Employment Letter, it is good practice for employers to respond to verification requests within a reasonable timeframe.

When must an employer respond to an Employment Verification Letter?

There is no specific law that employers are required to respond to their employees' requests for Employment Verification Letters.

Your employer may respond to your request whenever he or she wants to. However, if you need an Employment Verification Letter for urgent reasons, you should contact your employer immediately.

Even if an employer is not required to give a Verification of Employment Letter, it is good practice for employers to respond to verification requests within a reasonable timeframe.

Can you fake an Employment Verification Letter?

No, you cannot fake an Employment Verification Letter. Aside from it being illegal, you may be penalized for doing so because of providing false and misleading information.

The recipient of your Employment Verification Letter may contact the person or company you provided to check if it is legitimate. If the recipient finds it fake or invalid, you may face the consequences, such as a penalty fee, imprisonment, or lawsuit. The thing you are applying for will also get disqualified.

Where do I get an Employment Verification Letter?

You can get an Employment Verification Letter from your previous or current employer.

An Employment Verification Letter must include the verification of your employment date range, salary, and position. It must also contain the name and signature of the person who issued it. If you need additional information about your previous or current role, you can ask someone from human resources to help draft a letter on your behalf.

Can I receive my Employment Verification Letter in electronic format?

Yes, you can receive an Employment Verification Letter in an electronic format. Most employers prefer sending documents electronically via email. As long as the electronic Employment Verification Letter is signed, it is valid for use.

Make sure to ask your employer his or her preferred method to send an Employment Verification Letter. If your employer prefers email, you can provide him or her with your email address. Your employer may send it within a few days. Ensure to check your spam messages because your employer's email may land there.

Save a copy of your Employment Verification Letter in a safe place because you may need it for verification purposes at some point. You can also print out an Employment Letter of Verification if you prefer using paper documents.

Can I receive my Employment Verification Letter as a hard copy?

Yes, you can receive a hard copy of the Employment Verification Letter you requested from your employer. In fact, a hard copy Employment Verification Letter is most preferred when you are not working remotely or are still in contact with your employer.

How long can an Employment Verification Letter be valid?

Although there is no specific expiration date for an Employment Verification Letter, you must keep it up to date. For example, you may have verification issues if you use the Employment Verification Letter that was issued five years ago.

Most verification requests may require the verification of your current or most recent salary and job position. An Employment Verification Letter expires when you change roles, move to another company, or leave the workforce. Such verification issues can delay things for you and even affect your application's approval process.

How often should I ask my employer for an Employment Verification Letter?

You should ask your employer for an Employment Verification Letter when you need it. You may need a Verification of Employment Letter to submit a job application, apply for fringe benefits, or apply for a promotion. In some cases, employers require an Employment Verification Letter before making important decisions on personnel policies and compensation issues.

If you are concerned about asking your employer for an Employment Verification Letter frequently, you can ask the human resources department if it is possible to make the verification process easier for both parties.

What is the validity of an Employment Verification Letter?

An Employment Verification Letter has a preferable validity period of six months after issuance, but it can be renewed if needed. The following are possible reasons why you would need to renew an Employment verification letter:

  • You change your current employer or place of work.
  • You change your current or past job position.
  • You want verification of your salary at a particular time period.
  • Your verification is close to its expiration date.

You should not use an Employment verification letter that is older than six to twelve months. Employers may not accept verification requests that are too old, especially if your verification covers salary history or position changes for more than two years ago. If you need to change the dates of your verification, ask a company representative from human resources to help do so.

Can a former employer refuse to verify employment?

Yes, your former employer may refuse to verify your employment. It means he or she may not issue you an Employment Verification Letter. If you have a verification issue, it is best to ask the human resources department why your previous employer will not verify employment.

Employers may refuse verification for various reasons, including confidentiality, privacy concerns, or third-party information requests. In such a case, you may talk to them personally to explain your verification situation and ask them if they can help.

When you need verification of employment, you should make every effort to get an Employment Verification Letter from your previous employer. It can be done by calling them and verifying employment in person.

What should I do if my Employment Verification Letter has an error?

Do not panic if you receive your Employment Verification Letter with an error on it. You can still request a Replacement Verification Letter from your employer. Explain the error and ask your employer if he or she can revise it.

Your Employment Verification Letter should contain accurate information. If any of the following is incorrect, you may have to ask for a new Employment Verification Letter:

  • Your name
  • Salary type or amount
  • Job position or job function
  • Employment duration

If you see errors or inaccuracies in your Employment Verification Letter, ask your employer to make the necessary changes. Be sure to provide them with all of the correct information.

What happens if a prospective employer doesn't respond to an Employment Verification Letter?

Do not worry if you are applying for a new job and the prospective employer did not respond to your Employment Verification Letter. They may not be able to respond to your Employment Verification Letter due to the high demand for applications.

Other reasons why they may not have responded include the following:

  • The job offer was retracted due to a lack of verification.
  • They never received verification from the employer stated in your Employment Verification Letter.
  • Your Employment Verification Letter is outdated.

In any case, you should not feel offended if a prospective employer did not respond to your verification requests. In most cases, they may have overlooked it or do not need verification from that particular employer at this time. You can always contact them and ask why verification was not needed after all.

If the verification process is tedious and lengthy, it might be best to find a new employer who does not require verification from your previous employer. For this reason, you should always ask the prospective employer about the verification requirements for employment before submitting your resume or application.

Can HR verify salary?

Yes, the human resources department can verify salary information with the consent of the company owner.

You can request an Employment Verification Letter from the human resources department. You must disclose the reason why you need verification for your salary. For example, you may say that you are applying for government benefits, and they need your salary information to know if you are eligible.

Will an Employment Verification Letter hurt my chances for an application?

There is no harm in requesting verification for employment from a previous employer. An Employment Verification Letter will not affect your chances of getting a job offer or any benefits.

Your chances to get a certain application depend on the qualifications set by the recipient of your Employment Verification Letter. The information provided in the letter might affect your chances only if it is inaccurate, ineligible, or inconsistent with the application.

Do lenders verify employment after closing?

Yes, lenders usually verify employment before or after closing. After the purchase of a foreclosure property, they often request Verification of Employment Letters to ensure that no one is committing mortgage fraud.

Lenders may also request an Employment Verification Letter before the closing date to verify that the person who signed the mortgage application has a stable source of income.

What causes a red flag on a background check?

The recipient of your Employment Verification Letter can find a red flag during the verification process. If the receiving company or institution verifies that your information was false or inaccurate, they may consider it a threat and deny your application. Worse, you might be faced with legal consequences.

Being assigned with a red flag can cause trouble with your credit score or any benefits you are applying for. If you encounter this problem, contact the verification agency and provide them with all of the appropriate information so they can remove it from your record.

Having a clean record is vital for many applications. If you have committed fraud or wrongdoings in the past, contact the verification agency about the possibility of having your record expunged so you can get a better chance.

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